News

How Hector and Mary Fight Parkinson’s Together

After 41 years of marriage, four children, seven grandchildren and a Parkinson’s disease (PD) diagnosis, Hector and Mary Padilla still say they are in their honeymoon stage. “Throughout my entire career, every time I traveled for work, Mary took care of everything,” said Hector. “I always appreciated that someone so beautiful, talented and smart, devoted all her efforts to make…

Continue Reading

News

Appendix identified as a potential starting point for Parkinson’s disease

Removing the appendix early in life reduces the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease by 19 to 25 percent, according to the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind. The findings solidify the role of the gut and immune system in the genesis of the disease, and reveal that the appendix acts as a major reservoir for abnormally folded alpha-synuclein…

Continue Reading

News

UAB Researchers Awarded $2.5M to Study Role of Gut Microbiome in Parkinson’s

The U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command has awarded a four-year, $2.5 million grant to a team of scientists at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) to investigate the role of the gut microbiome — the trillions of microorganisms and their genetic material that live in the intestinal tract — in Parkinson’s disease. A goal is to determine if…

Continue Reading

News

Investigational Herbal Therapy DA-9805 Shows Neuroprotective Effects in Parkinson’s Mouse Model

An investigational herbal product called DA-9805 exerts its neuroprotective activity by preventing mitochondria damage in brain cells, a mouse study has found. This compound is currently being evaluated in a Phase 2a clinical trial (NCT03189563) in early Parkinson’s disease patients. The study, “Triple herbal extract DA-9805 exerts a neuroprotective effect via amelioration of mitochondrial damage in experimental models of Parkinson’s disease,”…

Continue Reading

News

Transient Cerebral Swelling a Common Side Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation, Study Suggests

Swelling of brain areas close to where the electrodes that deliver deep brain stimulation (DBS) are placed is a common and transient side effect of this treatment in Parkinson’s disease patients, a study suggests. Long-term impact of this adverse reaction and potential related complications are still unknown and warrant further analysis, researchers say. The study, “Peri-lead edema after DBS surgery…

Continue Reading

News

Alpha-Synuclein Could Be Biomarker for Non-Motor Symptoms in Parkinson’s, Study Suggests

Reduced alpha-synuclein levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) — the liquid surrounding the brain and spinal cord — are associated with more severe non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s patients, according to a study. The study, “CSF α-synuclein inversely correlates with non-motor symptoms in a cohort of PD patients,” published in the journal Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, suggests that measurements of alpha-synuclein could be…

Continue Reading

News

Listen to Our Top 10 Podcast Episodes Now

Our podcast, Substantial Matters: Life and Science of Parkinson’s, features more than 35 episodes about the latest PD treatments, research and therapies that help make life better for people with Parkinson’s. Catch up with our 10 most popular episodes:  1. How to Manage Parkinson’s “Off” Time Parkinson’s symptoms can get better and worse throughout the day. These so-called “on-off” fluctuations…

Continue Reading

News

Data Lacking on Link Between Genetic Mutations and Parkinson’s Symptoms, Review Finds

There is a substantial lack of data describing the link between the genetic mutations identified as inheritable causes of Parkinson’s — those that affect the SNCA, LRRK2, and VPS35 genes — and patient symptoms, a review study has found. Despite this missing information, the researchers conducting the review were still able to make some determinations, including findings indicating that SNCA mutation carriers are younger…

Continue Reading